Tavel

🇨🇭

Exceptional Geneva brass teapot by Auguste Dannhauer and Jean Dunand

1920

Tavel

🇨🇭

Exceptional Geneva brass teapot by Auguste Dannhauer and Jean Dunand

1920

Color

N/A

Condition

Good

Material

Brass

Place of production

Geneva

Payment methods (2)

Shipping Methods (3)

Description

Auguste Dannhauer (Geneva, 1866 - Geneva, 1928) This hammered brass teapot is the work of Auguste Dannhauer. Coming from a family of coppersmiths, he was one of the last masters in Geneva in this trade. Specifically, he learned the craft from his father at a young age on Chaudronniers Street, just a few steps from the museum where, due to noise disturbances, all artisans of the profession were confined in the 17th century. His father taught him the art of crafting pots, molds, cups, and other everyday objects using a hammer and an anvil. These two tools are essential in coppersmithing, allowing the shaping of base metals (copper, brass, tin, lead) into sheets before assembling them through soldering and riveting. Created around 1920, this teapot is characteristic of coppersmithing, a noble form of the coppersmith's trade. At this time, Auguste Dannhauer welcomed Jean Dunand (1877-1942) into his workshop; an experience that decisively influenced the young apprentice's career. Good condition, minor loss to vine around the handle. 25 cm maximum length, 21 cm high up to the handle

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Description

Auguste Dannhauer (Geneva, 1866 - Geneva, 1928)

This hammered brass teapot is the work of Auguste Dannhauer. Coming from a family of coppersmiths, he was one of the last masters in Geneva in this trade. Specifically, he learned the craft from his father at a young age on Chaudronniers Street, just a few steps from the museum where, due to noise disturbances, all artisans of the profession were confined in the 17th century. His father taught him the art of crafting pots, molds, cups, and other everyday objects using a hammer and an anvil. These two tools are essential in coppersmithing, allowing the shaping of base metals (copper, brass, tin, lead) into sheets before assembling them through soldering and riveting. Created around 1920, this teapot is characteristic of coppersmithing, a noble form of the coppersmith's trade. At this time, Auguste Dannhauer welcomed Jean Dunand (1877-1942) into his workshop; an experience that decisively influenced the young apprentice's career.

Good condition, minor loss to vine around the handle.
25 cm maximum length, 21 cm high up to the handle